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Thursday Thoughts: The Secret to a Happy Marriage is Good Syrup

John and I celebrate our 26th anniversary this month.  We enjoy a happy marriage , and like to believe that we communicate well.  Recently, though, our youngest daughter told us that the secret to a happy marriage is not good communication, but rather, good syrup.

 

Saturday morning, youth from church gathered to our home for breakfast and to watch general conference.  I scrambled eggs, cooked bacon, and made waffles.  I had purchased Costco-sized bottles of Log Cabin syrupI vastly overestimated how much food we would need, so we had leftovers.

As I was setting the table the next morning, I put out our jug of pure maple syrup instead of the imitation stuff.  Youngest daughter brought the Log Cabin over, which prompted a discussion comparing pure maple syrup with maple-flavored syrup.  I confessed that the difference in taste didn't mean that much to me, but that because John prefers real maple syrup, I always buy it.  Oldest daughter said she thought we always had pure maple syrup because I have a strong preference against artificial ingredients.  I said that although she had my preferences right, the real reason for buying real maple syrup was because John likes it so much. 

At this point, John looked at me and said, "I always thought it was for the reason [oldest daughter] gave."  

All these years, I've been splurging on the good stuff.  

John, probably after mentally adding up potential savings, said, "If you want to buy the other kind sometime, that's OK."  

He continued, laughing: "The secret to a good marriage, girls, is good communication."

Youngest daughter replied, "I thought it was good syrup."

Have you experienced any long-term misunderstandings? 

Thanks to my sweet husband, who doesn't say a word about my splurges. 


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Comments

  1. A good story with a perfect moral.

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  2. Good story about communication--it is so easy to assume things.

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  3. That is so funny. I'm know we have had them, but I can't think of any long-term miscommunications off the top of my head. I'm sure my husband would think of one in a heartbeat, though. :)

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  4. ... what Nancy said.... Good communication is everything in a marriage. We both dislike syrup, so the other part I have no knowledge of....

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  5. Oh I love this..your blessed with a good husband..I always buy my favorites...he never cares or so I think,,,

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  6. Funny story! ~ Some things are worth splurging on. :)
    I am a true believer in using the real McCoy, not an artificial, lab produced facsimilie...real sugar, actual maple syrup, quality tea, and scrimp on things we don't eat(and put into our bodies). The taste is much better, too. Congrats on 26 years!

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  7. Put down the Log Cabin and back slowly away from the table. Clearly you need to come visit your sister in the land of maple syrup. I'll feed you maple syrup, maple donuts, maple bacon, maple ice cream, maple cookies, and maple pecan pie until your taste buds are appropriately calibrated. Thank goodness you posted so I learned of this emergency!

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    Replies
    1. Oh, yes, sign me up for taste bud calibration! I'd love to come visit you in the land of maple syrup. How in the world did we end up across the country from each other?

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  8. What a great story. My husband used to tell the story about his mother and father and peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. His mother made two of them for lunch every day for his father. One of the children once asked about it and their mother said it was because their father liked them so much. He finally spoke up to say that, though he liked them, he didn't need two every day, to the exclusion of all other types of sandwiches. She had no idea.

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  9. A very funny post! We've been married 41 years and our communications skills are just about as good as yours! LOL Happy Weekend!

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  10. It is a great story and your sister is right! How could you not tell the difference? It's like the difference between good vanilla extract and vanilla flavoring! Your sister will fix you!

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  11. Love it. Not long ago I told my husband maybe we could change the rose wall in the living room. He said, "I've never liked it so it's fine with me." I hated that wall for 5 years but he was so sweet to paint it I never wanted to tell him. Maple syrup or paint...all the same!

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  12. It just goes to show; something that my hubby and I found out long ago; we can't read each other's minds so we need to stop trying or at least assuming that we can. It makes for much better communications!
    At our house it's Sour Dough Pancakes.... the rest of the family likes syrup on them; me I like some butter/margarine and that's it! I'm a bit of a purest on my sour dough's.It brings out the flavor!
    Jean C.

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  13. Cute story. Thanks for sharing on the HomeAcre Hop. Come back and see us this week: http://everythinghomewithcarol.com/self-sufficient-homeacre-hop-and-homemade-soap-giveaway/

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  14. This is such a cute story. I just love children's open and honest look at life. After almost forty-four years of marriage, we have definitely had numerous "miscommunication" hits, but we are usually able to figure it all out without incident!

    Sorry I haven't visited in a while, Kristi. I thought I had your blog listed in my sidebar, which I did not but now do! I'll do better -- I'll TRY to do better!

    Carol

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  15. This I know - Hugh and I both agree on having "good" syrup in the house.

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  16. Great story and yes I have my share of misunderstandings! Thanks for linking with me :)

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  17. Oh, wow, what a great story! Reminds me of the kinds of things my Grandparents used to tell us. :)

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