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Showing posts from October, 2018

Social Media Fast: Blogging to Return Mid-October

As many of you know, I am a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Tonight, at the women's session of General Conference, President Nelson challenged us to take a 10-day fast from social media. Although technology can be used for good, it is easy for me to become unbalanced in my time. I decided to accept his challenge and am looking forward to focusing my attention elsewhere. 

The posts that I've promised for next week will be delayed; they aren't ready to schedule to publish yet. However, I will return to blogging and other social media platforms later this month. 

You are welcome to join me in the break, if you'd like. I'm thankful for you, and will catch up with you when I return. 😊

Ten Things of Thankful: Grand Week Edition

The past week and a half has been a blur, as my parents came to town and we visited four national parks in four days. I'll publish a post next week detailing our adventures, but for now, let's just say we all had a grand time!

I'm so thankful this week:

1. That my parents could come to visit.
2. That we could enjoy the beauty of nature.
3. That we could laugh (a lot!)
4. That my parents extended their trip on both ends, so we could visit with other relatives and enjoy other sites (like Moon's Rare Books) as well.

Sometimes, after a vacation, it is hard to get back into a routine again. I'm thankful to be easing into things:

5. John and I were able to attend a meet-up for bloggers here in Utah. We were served dinner, learned about the #LightTheWorld Christmas campaign for 2018, listened to the Debra Bonner Unity Gospel Choir, and watched a showing of the movie Jane and Emma. While we were there, we also just happened to run into someone who used to live in our area in Cali…

Six Sentence Story: Crunch

Each week, Denise ateGirlie on the Edge hosts the Six Sentence Story link up. It's an enjoyable challenge: to write a sentence of only six sentences, based on the prompt word. This week's prompt is "crunch."

As a little girl, she read the papers, and knew that the Peanuts gang and others derived joy from jumping into big piles of fallen leaves, but she couldn't imagine exactly how that translated into fun. The leaves on the oak tree in the neighbor's yard turned brown before falling to the ground, and the Oregon rain kept them constantly soggy. 

She grew up knowing the jokes about Oregon's weather (Oregonians don't tan, they rust, and Rain is liquid sunshine), but didn't truly appreciate the underlying truth until she moved out-of-state for college. She couldn't get over the fact that the sky was cloudless most of the time, and that weeks could go by without precipitation--even in the fall!

Walking to her apartment after class one day, she was st…

Wednesday Works: DIY Fall Wreath

Since moving into our house in July, our front door has been naked. I couldn't stand that any longer, so ventured into the abyss of the basement to find the box labeled "wreaths." Alas, though I found that box, I didn't find a fall wreath. I probably should have tackled unpacking and organizing all of the boxes in the basement, but what fun is that? I decided instead to pick up some supplies and make a different autumn wreath. I also thought, "Maybe I should try my hand at making a YouTube video."


Basically, I spent 10 minutes explaining my complicated technique of how to shove stuff into a grapevine wreath. You don't have to be crafty in order to make a wreath. 😊
Do you like to decorate for fall?

Tuesday Travels: Moon's Rare Books

Last April, John and I stumbled across a little shop in Provo, Utah that we enjoyed so much that now anytime anyone visits us, we make sure to take them there. Moon's Rare Books, though it is a store, is set up more like a museum, and welcomes visitors who are just there to look.


As you walk in the front door, you step onto a floor made of 200-year-old bricks imported from France. Glass cases hold ever-changing displays of books, historical artifacts, and movie props. Several pioneer furniture pieces, made of pine but carefully painted with a feather to give the appearance of a finer wood, sit in the front of the store. 

Heading further back, you feel like you are walking down a narrow street in old England, with little shops on either side. Each is themed differently: one is dedicated to classic first edition books, one to Mormon/Utah history, one to Bibles, and the remaining two to pioneer household items and children's books and toys. 



The store employees happily give free tou…

Monday Mentions: The Great Alone

A month or so ago, I decided I would join the local library's book club. I read September's selection, The Great Alone, by Kristin Hannah, and then realized that I would not be available for the first meeting. In lieu of discussing it among book club members, I thought I would give my impressions here. I won't delve deeply into the plot, as I don't want to spoil it for anyone who might want to read it. 


The Great Alone tackles the big topics of veterans' mental health and the complexities of family abuse. Despite the seriousness of the themes, hope and love weave their way throughout the pages. We follow a man, his wife, and their daughter on a journey to Alaska, where they relocate and have to learn quickly how to survive. 

The book is well-written and believable. It does not provide societal solutions to the challenges posed, but brings to life the importance of improving mental health services and support for battered women. 

Have you read The Great Alone?  What we…