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Monday Morning in the Kitchen: Blackberry Pie

One of the reasons I decided on "Monday Morning in the Kitchen" was so I could share recipes with my children.  I asked my oldest daughter what recipe she would like to see, and she immediately said, "Blackberry pie!  We ate that all the time when I was little."




I don't remember fixing pies "all the time," but we did live in Washington state, where wild blackberries are abundant. Unfortunately, I no longer have access to a blackberry patch, so I had to purchase berries to use in this pie.  If only there were such a thing as tumbleweed pie. . . 

Blackberry Pie

Preheat oven to 375°.

Crust:

Combine 2 cups flour and 3/4 teaspoon salt.  Cut in 2/3 cup softened (but not melted) butter.  Combine 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar, 1 egg, and 3-1/2 tablespoons cold water.  Mix well, then add to flour mixture.  Stir until combined and dough forms a ball.   

Tear off a piece of plastic wrap (roughly the size of a 9-inch pie tin), roll half of the dough into a ball, and place the ball on the plastic wrap.  Cover with another piece of plastic wrap.  Now roll the dough out.  It won't stick to the rolling pin nor the countertop, and it is easy to peel off the plastic wrap.  

Put the rolled-out crust into a 9-inch pie tin.  The remaining dough will be used for the top crust.

Filling:

Combine 6 cups washed and drained fresh blackberries, 1-1/2 cup sugar, 1/3 cup flour, 1 teaspoon lemon peel, and 2 teaspoons vanilla.  Stir gently but thoroughly,  until the berries are no longer white with flour/sugar.  Place on top of bottom crust, then roll out top crust and put it on top of the fruit. (You can also dot the top of the fruit with butter before adding the top crust, but I forgot to do that this time.)  Vent the pie by cutting a design into the top crust.

Protect the edge of the pie crust with a pie shield or strips of foil.  Bake for 50 minutes, then remove pie shield and bake for 20 minutes more.  (I like to put a cookie sheet on the rack below the rack my pie is on, to catch any juicy drips.) 

Now the hard part:  Let the pie cool for an hour or so before slicing, to allow the filling to gel a bit.  (I routinely ignore that step.)  Enjoy warm with vanilla ice cream. 


Thanks for seasonal delights.


You might find my posts on these blog hops:
Sew Darn Crafty Party,  Find a Friend Friday, Farmgirl Friday Blog Hop, Show Your Stuff, The Wildly Original Link Party, Wow Us Wednesdays, Down Home Blog Hop, Tuesday Archive Link Up, Linky Tuesday at Freemotion by the River, Grandparents Say It Saturday
The Creative Home Acre Hop Best Blog Post Ever, Grand Social,
Crafty Garden Mama,
Let's Get Social Sundays
Freedom Fridays
Tuesdays with a Twist 



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Comments

  1. Oh my goodness!!
    I would love to have a piece of that right now with my coffee. That looks so good and I am so
    going to TRY and make it I hope it looks just
    like yours.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I love blackberries! My father used to grow them in the yard when I was growing up. I think I may struggle with that last step also :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. The difficult part for me would be not sampling the berries before the pie was made.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Oooh this looks and sounds delicious!

    ReplyDelete
  5. mmmm looks good. We have blackberries growing wild here. I remember my grandma making cobblers with them and I sort of adopted the tradition. A lot easier to make then a pie for this amature cook haha ;)

    ReplyDelete
  6. Berry pies are one of my very favorite things in the whole entire world. I've never dared make one myself, though. Why? I don't know. But now I know I'll be giving it a shot. Thank you so much for sharing this delicious-looking recipe in the GRAND Social!

    ReplyDelete
  7. I love pie -- and at almost 7 AM it does sound like the perfect thing to go with my coffee. Getting blackberries in southern California is not easy and certainly expensive but I will save this in case I get a deal at the farmers' market!

    ReplyDelete
  8. I can't imagine the discipline it must take to let that fresh pie sit there for an hour. My husband won't let me eat his fresh bread until the next day for the same reason, when what I really want to do is eat it warm from the oven.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Oh this looks so good! We used to pick and make jelly because I can't digest seeds but love the blackberry flavor.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Beautiful--and looks delicious!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Tumble weed pie? Where on earth do you live now? I would imagine that picking blackberries is a tricky business. They are considered weeds here in Australia.

    ReplyDelete

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