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Heat, Humidity, Harvest, and Back-to-School


I mentioned recently that I needed to pick and can the tomatoes.  As you can see, one part of that task is complete, but somehow triple-digit temperatures and humidity--can you believe it?--dissuade me from attempting the canning.  I'm sticking the tomatoes in the fridge and hoping that it will be a bit more comfortable on Monday.  I really don't have reason to complain, though--the current humidity level is hardly stifling, but it is downright tropical compared to our normal, "but it's a dry heat!" climate.

Instead of canning, I'm going to take youngest daughter out to lunch somewhere with a good air conditioner, and we're going to discuss our homeschooling schedule for the fall.  Although the public schools started here a few weeks ago, we're easing into our fall routine.  She missed the first week of early-morning seminary due to BYU Education Week.  This week she did start seminary, but that's about it.  Now that the college kids have left for their apartments, it's time to start in on the academics.  Youngest daughter is signed up for a few online classes this year, but they don't start until September.  I'm hoping to use today's lunchtime to communicate expectations, plan for fun learning experiences, and generally encourage enthusiasm for the opportunity to learn new things.  I might even schedule these lunch meetings periodically, to allow us a chance to review the past months and set new goals for the upcoming ones. (I love the optimism that a new school year affords!)

 

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