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Ten Things of Thankful: Change Edition

It has been a week of transition, as I was released from my calling as Relief Society (women's organization) president in my ward at church, and called to be the Primary (children's organization) pianist.  I loved serving with the women, and am simultaneously looking forward to playing the piano in Primary, so it has been a bit of an emotional week.  As always, though, I am thankful.

1.  I'm thankful for Relief Society.  It is the women's organization in the church, and all women ages 18 and up belong to it, no matter where they might be serving in the church.  Even though I will spend my time with the children on Sundays now, I am still part of Relief Society.

2.  I'm thankful for the Relief Society motto:  "Charity never Faileth."  Charity is defined as "the pure love of Christ," and encompasses so much more than bringing a dinner to a sick family. The motto helps me remember that everything really does stem from the two great commandments:  Love God, and Love your neighbor as yourself.

3.  I'm thankful for the friendships I was able to develop.  Over the years I served, I had various women who were called to be my counselors and secretary.  I have appreciated the time we spent together, the things I learned from them, and our deepening friendship.  

4. In addition to the friendships I've developed through serving with my presidency, I'm thankful for the friendships I've developed with the other women in the ward.  I've prayed for and with them, laughed with them, listened to their heartaches, and been so appreciative of their service to each other.  I have felt their support, and it was a joy to serve.

5.  I'm thankful for the chance I had to work closely with other leaders in the ward.  Sometimes the LDS church is criticized as lacking the voice of women, but nothing could be further from the truth.  My opinion was requested and my suggestions were always valued--not in a "let's humor her" sort of way, but sincerely.

6.  I'm thankful for the women who are serving in the new Relief Society presidency.  I've had the opportunity to spend hours with the new president, trying to ease her transition into this calling. She is overwhelmed with the responsibility, as all Relief Society presidents are, particularly in the beginning, but she is more than capable of serving well.  The rest of her presidency is similarly well-suited.  I look forward to their leadership.  

7.  Though I have absolutely loved my time as Relief Society president, I am thankful for the chance to serve in a less time-consuming calling.  

8.  Specifically, I am thankful to be the Primary pianist.  I have served in this position in some of my previous wards, and I love serving as pianist for the children.  I love music; I love children; children love music; it's just a happy place to be.  

9.  I'm thankful for the opportunity I will have to work closely with the chorister and the other women serving in Primary.  

10.  As always, I'm thankful for John.  If I say he has "put up with me," he will deny that wording, but he has been so supportive during this emotional week.  Saturday, after I had very little sleep the night before, and after about a 12 hour day with Relief Society events and tasks, John took me out to watch Paul Reiser's stand-up comedy routine.  For the most part, it was an enjoyable show, and it was good to spend time with John laughing together.  On the way to the show, we stopped to take photos of an absolutely stunning sunset.  And just as that sunset ended the day Saturday, I'm going to let it end this TToT post.  


Photo:  Palm trees stand in the foreground of a purple/salmon/pink/orange (untouched) sunset

How has your week gone?  Comment below, and if you'd like to join in, head over to the Ten Things of Thankful blog and link your post!

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Ten Things of Thankful



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Comments

  1. Thank you for your service to the Relief Society: I'm sure you gave your all to the group and others learned from your example. Transitions are difficult but necessary, especially in organizations. Sharing the work load brings new ideas and lessens the chance that people "burn out."

    Beautiful sunset photo!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was really my privilege to serve in the Relief Society, and now I look forward to spending Sundays with the children.

      Delete
  2. That's about the most amazing sunset I think I've ever seen! Congratulations on getting to be the Primary pianist. Such a fun place to be!!! I was just called as the 2nd counselor in the RS presidency a few weeks ago in a ward that we are hoping will be permanent but for now is very temporary. Who knows what we have in store for us, right?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Life is definitely full of changes. I'm sure you'll be great in RS!

      Delete
  3. It sounds like this past week was both tiring and emotional, yet filled with love and thankfulness. Your role as Relief Society president was a big one, and I know you put your whole heart into it and did it amazingly well! I'm agreeing that the simpler job of Primary pianist will be a fun break from that, and something you look forward to. Changes are a good thing, but they also take some getting used to. I enjoy learning more about your church and your involvement, I like the concept of being actively involved, because real faith is like that, charity is love in action. It was so sweet of John to see you needed a break, and God blessed you with the
    most amazing sunset I've ever seen, the photo is definitely frame-worthy! Thank you for sharing with us!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Change does take getting used to, but one change I am looking forward to is the fact I will not have a 6:30 a.m. meeting on Sunday morning--even though the clocks are springing ahead I can sleep in! :-)

      Delete
  4. That is an absolutely stunning sunset photo - wow!
    As always, I love love love how you include John in your TToT posts and what a beautiful relationship the two of you share.
    Very cool items related to your church involvement - love hearing the things you're involved in.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I couldn't believe just how gorgeous the sunset was!

      Delete
  5. First of all, that is an amazing sunset photo. And as the sun sets on your service as president of the Relief Society, I am sure the dawning of your time as Primary pianist will be just as rewarding and absolutely fun. I know how transitions can be difficult, even if they are good transitions. You have a wonderful support system in John, your church, and of course, from up above.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There's the segue I was looking for: ". . . as the sun sets on your service. . . " Glad you could verbalize what I was feeling. I've served as Primary pianist before in other wards, and I love that calling! It will be great. :-)

      Delete
  6. excellent sunset photo (lacking an ocean does the sailor's prediction of 'red sky at night, sailor's delight' still hold true?)
    sounds like your time as President was that all-too-rare thing in life, an activity/avocation/interest in which (we) can more out than we put it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If a tree falls in the forest and there is no one around to hear it. . . Whatever desert sailors thought of the sunset, it was spectacular!

      I have found that I almost always get more out of a calling than I put into it, regardless of the calling. I think that is one of the blessings of service. I could write a huge long response, but Mosiah 2 does a better job than I could: https://www.lds.org/scriptures/bofm/mosiah/2?lang=eng

      Delete

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