Skip to main content

#52Stories Project: Favorite Hobbies and Pasttimes

One of my earliest childhood memories is of an oft-repeated routine:  climbing the concrete steps of the old city library; opening the massive, heavy doors; smelling that distinct 'book' smell; walking past the rows of grown-up books to the door in the back of the room; and going downstairs to the bright, friendly children's section of the library.   

As long as I can remember, I've been a reader.  I don't remember learning how to read;  I think I absorbed reading through frequent exposure to books.  My mom would take us kids to the library weekly, and we always checked out piles of books each time.  It was a bit of a shock to get to elementary school and realize that we were only allowed to borrow 1 or 2 books at a time from the school library.  


Photo:  My mom sits on a child's chair at my Grandma's house at Christmastime and reads a book to me


Although we had a television when I was younger, my family got rid of it when I was ten.  I didn't care--that just gave me more time to read books.  I loved Nancy Drew mysteries, Little House books, and anything to do with dogs, but there were many other books I read as well.  I loved being transported through time and space to exotic (to me) places.  


Photo:  A common scene growing up: my Dad, me, and my brother on the couch reading.  (My sister was undoubtedly reading at the time this was taken, too, and Mom must have been taking the photo.)

I remember reading myself to sleep every night, and being upset with a babysitter who insisted that I turn off the light right away. She didn't seem to believe me that my parents allowed me to keep it on and read until I was ready to sleep.


Photo:  A young me, engrossed in a book

I still enjoy reading, but don't spend as much time reading as I did as a child.  My eyes close as soon as my head hits the pillow now, so reading before bed just doesn't work anymore, and often my days are spent with grown-up responsibilities.  I read my scriptures first thing in the morning, and read the newspaper at breakfast. Every now and then, though, I will get lost in a good work of fiction, and when I do, I'm that same little bookworm I've always been.


Photo:  My 2-year-old self, reading the newspaper while relaxing on the couch

Are you a grown-up version of your childhood self?  Do you still enjoy the same hobbies that you did as a child?

Next week's #52Stories project prompt:  Do you like to dabble in lots of different hobbies? If so, what are they?

Thanks for books.



Pin It

Comments

  1. yessss. I was recently telling me girls the same thing. I love to read but I also love to decorate and redecorate my little dollhouses.. As a child I spent most time decorating and redecorating my Barbie house. lol.

    ReplyDelete
  2. What a fun blast from past!

    ReplyDelete
  3. When I was teaching, I could always tell which families encouraged reading. Readers are good writers and have an extensive vocabulary.

    ReplyDelete
  4. This was a wonderful post, a trip down memory lane and the childhood joy of reading that has never left me. Your photos were a delightful addition! Going to the library from the time I was small, and then working at both the public and school libraries when I was in high school were wonderful experiences. Now we access books online more often than not, because tablet reading is easier on the hands and eyes, but I still love the feel and smell of a real book, and I always will!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Conversations are so much nicer when more than one person does the talking. :-) Please leave a comment and let me know your thoughts; I'd love to hear from you!

Popular posts from this blog

Ten Things of Thankful: Even in Times of Uncertainty

  A railroad switch point on the tracks at the Golden Spike National Historic Park There is a lot I don't know. I don't know who will lead the United States for the next four years (at the time I'm composing this post, that hasn't been determined yet.) I don't know when covid cases will stop rising in my state and start decreasing. I don't know how challenging situations will turn out. There is much uncertainty in life. Living in limbo-land is hard. It's emotionally exhausting. It can be immobilizing. My body seems to think chocolate is the answer, but I know that isn't a long-term solution. What do I need in times like these? I need to REMEMBER . 1. R esilience. People are resilient. I am resilient. I'm thankful for resilience. 2. " E ach Life That Touches Ours for Good." So many people, both those I know in "real life," and those I have only met virtually, have taught me, encouraged me, and been examples to me. I'm thankful

Ten Things of Thankful: Dad's Influence Edition

Infant-me, sitting on the wood floor, looks up at my dad, who is sitting on a brown sofa and smiling down to me Here in the United States, it is Father's Day weekend. I did not realize until recently that Father's Day was not officially made a holiday until 1972. 1972! Now, while I realize that many people consider 1972 eons ago, I do not. I'm glad that fathers have a day of recognition now, because they surely deserve acknowledgement.  I thought for this week's Ten Things of Thankful post, I would list ten lessons I'm thankful my dad taught me. My dad is a teacher. Not only did he impart his knowledge to countless junior high aged kids throughout his career, he taught--and still teaches--my siblings and me. He is not a preachy teacher; he's a humble man whose lessons I feel like I learned through osmosis. When he would get home from work, we'd all sit down as a family for supper. Often, our phone would ring, and on the other end of the line would be a paren

Ten Things of Thankful: Summer Strawberries and Procrastinated Projects

A brilliantly-colored dark pink and purple fuchsia blossom You would think that by the time a person reaches my age, she would not be surprised by the passing of time, yet I find myself nearly constantly amazed that a certain amount of time has passed--whether that be a week, month, year, or couple of decades. Earlier this year, I planted a garden. Yesterday I harvested my first strawberry. Earlier this year, I also planted fuchsia starts, and now the flowers are blooming. How is that possible? (And why am I surprised?) Sometime around the turn of the century (and it still seems strange to use that phrase about the year 2000), we bought a circa 1935 dresser. It needed some TLC, but had a cool curvy front. This past week, I finally got around to applying some Restor-A-Finish and Feed-N-Wax, and now the dresser still looks old, but not dilapidated. I still need to apply some hide glue to some loose pieces, but I'm counting progress as a win. For as long as I can remember, I've be