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#52Stories Project: Favorite Hobbies and Pasttimes

One of my earliest childhood memories is of an oft-repeated routine:  climbing the concrete steps of the old city library; opening the massive, heavy doors; smelling that distinct 'book' smell; walking past the rows of grown-up books to the door in the back of the room; and going downstairs to the bright, friendly children's section of the library.   

As long as I can remember, I've been a reader.  I don't remember learning how to read;  I think I absorbed reading through frequent exposure to books.  My mom would take us kids to the library weekly, and we always checked out piles of books each time.  It was a bit of a shock to get to elementary school and realize that we were only allowed to borrow 1 or 2 books at a time from the school library.  


Photo:  My mom sits on a child's chair at my Grandma's house at Christmastime and reads a book to me


Although we had a television when I was younger, my family got rid of it when I was ten.  I didn't care--that just gave me more time to read books.  I loved Nancy Drew mysteries, Little House books, and anything to do with dogs, but there were many other books I read as well.  I loved being transported through time and space to exotic (to me) places.  


Photo:  A common scene growing up: my Dad, me, and my brother on the couch reading.  (My sister was undoubtedly reading at the time this was taken, too, and Mom must have been taking the photo.)

I remember reading myself to sleep every night, and being upset with a babysitter who insisted that I turn off the light right away. She didn't seem to believe me that my parents allowed me to keep it on and read until I was ready to sleep.


Photo:  A young me, engrossed in a book

I still enjoy reading, but don't spend as much time reading as I did as a child.  My eyes close as soon as my head hits the pillow now, so reading before bed just doesn't work anymore, and often my days are spent with grown-up responsibilities.  I read my scriptures first thing in the morning, and read the newspaper at breakfast. Every now and then, though, I will get lost in a good work of fiction, and when I do, I'm that same little bookworm I've always been.


Photo:  My 2-year-old self, reading the newspaper while relaxing on the couch

Are you a grown-up version of your childhood self?  Do you still enjoy the same hobbies that you did as a child?

Next week's #52Stories project prompt:  Do you like to dabble in lots of different hobbies? If so, what are they?

Thanks for books.



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Comments

  1. yessss. I was recently telling me girls the same thing. I love to read but I also love to decorate and redecorate my little dollhouses.. As a child I spent most time decorating and redecorating my Barbie house. lol.

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  2. What a fun blast from past!

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  3. When I was teaching, I could always tell which families encouraged reading. Readers are good writers and have an extensive vocabulary.

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  4. This was a wonderful post, a trip down memory lane and the childhood joy of reading that has never left me. Your photos were a delightful addition! Going to the library from the time I was small, and then working at both the public and school libraries when I was in high school were wonderful experiences. Now we access books online more often than not, because tablet reading is easier on the hands and eyes, but I still love the feel and smell of a real book, and I always will!

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