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#52Stories Project: Work

Although I haven't joined in every week for the #52Stories project, I do want to participate as often as possible.  This last week's prompt was: Who taught you how to work?  What would you want your children and grandchildren to learn from your example?

Answer one question per week as part of the #52stories project from FamilySearch.



My parents taught me to work.  From a young age, I was included in family chores.


Photo:  Impish toddler me stands on a stool next to my mom in the kitchen and rolls out dough with my little rolling pin.


Photo:  Me as a young child, standing in the doorway between our kitchen and utility room, looking over my shoulder with a broom in one hand and a dustpan in the other.


Photo:  Me as a young child, vacuuming the living room rug with an old blue canister vacuum


Work didn't just include normal, everyday chores.  Work included big projects, too.  We landscaped the front yard.  We painted the exterior of the house.  Then we moved on to a much bigger project: building a new house, and ridding the property of Scotch broom.  

After the new house was framed, and the exterior walls and roof were up, we moved in and continued working.  Lest you doubt me, I found a few photos for proof:


Photo:  High-school aged me, painting dresser drawers in the living room in front of a wall of insulation
This next photo doesn't seem to demonstrate the concept of work, but when I adjust the exposure, you will see that we lived in a construction zone (which very much did represent a lot of work!)


Photo:  Me dressed up for some long-forgotten reason


Photo:  Table saws under the stairs in the living room.  The piano now takes its place of honor in that exact spot.
Back in the day of film (as opposed to digital photos), everyday life wasn't documented in photos as frequently as it is today.  Even though I don't have photos of the hours we spent pulling up Scotch broom and burning the big piles, I have memories of those work days--and they are pleasant memories.  I might have grumbled a bit at the time, and I'm pretty sure I got a blister or two, but there is something worthwhile and satisfying about hard work.  I hope that my children and grandchildren will learn the joy that comes through work and accomplishing hard things.

I'm thankful for hard work.

Who taught you to work?


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Comments

  1. Growing up on a farm, I learned that work is a lifestyle. I have a solid work ethic and spirit of service to others because of that background.

    P.S. My Mom had the same blue vacuum and I had a yellow one.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I remember hearing once of a family who lived in the city and purposely moved to a farm when their children were young, for the purpose of teaching them how to work.

      (I used to be scared of that vacuum's loud motor, but I sure liked the automatic cord rewind.)

      Delete
  2. This was like a trip down memory lane! My sisters and I were helping mom in the kitchen and with household chores as soon as we were able to stand on a chair or hold a dustpan in place. We learned to bake and clean, garden, and paint, and from my Dad I learned fishing and carpentry skills. Good times, though at the time we probably grumbled on ocassion, since work always came before play. Too many children grow up not helping out now because "they are so busy" with their own lives, I think that's a mistake. We are all responsible for the care of where we live and for our own homes someday, it's never too early to learn responsibility. I can only imagine the challenges of trying to live amidst the construction zone of a house being built, but I know it gives you all great pride when you gather there now!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That construction zone remained for decades, but John is sure glad of it, because I learned that love is what makes a home, not finished floors, walls, or kitchens. :-)

      Delete
  3. A trip for me too down memory lane. I learned to crochet, sew, cook, clean and everything else from my grandma. It was the best of times.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It sounds like your grandma was a big influence in your life. :-)

      Delete

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