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Tuesday Time to Tackle: DIY Swamp Cooler Pump Replacement

Yesterday morning, despite having the swamp cooler on all night long, we woke up to 81 degree temperatures inside the house.  John went outside to inspect and announced that the swamp cooler pump had stopped working. Fortunately, replacing the pump is a quick and simple do-it-yourself project. 





It's so simple, I could have done it--but I didn't.  I let John demonstrate, and I took photos.  Not only did John do the project, he suggested it might make a good "Tuesday Time to Tackle" blog post.  What a great husband I have!

Before beginning, unplug the swamp cooler.  Lift up gently on the swamp cooler side, to remove the panel and access the pump.  Unplug the pump.


Snap out the little plastic piece that holds the pump in place.  (I don't have a photo of that little part, but it's behind John's fingers.)

This is the new pump; I forgot to take a photo of this step.

Slide the pump out of the bracket.

(OK, so this is actually a photo of sliding the new pump in, but you get the idea.)
 Release the clamp from the tubing, and remove the tubing from the pump.


Now that the old pump is disconnected from the swamp cooler, it's time to put the new pump in.  Slide it into position, tilting it a bit so you match the notches with the bracket.  Reattach the little plastic piece that holds the pump in place.



Now, reattach the tubing, clamping it into place.  Plug in the pump, and clamp the cord out of the way.

 
Go inside the house and plug in the swamp cooler.   If you get water flowing down the sides, do a little happy dance, because you've just installed a pump correctly.


Remember to put the sides of the swamp cooler back in place, of course, then try to stay cool!

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Thanks for John, who saves us money (the part only costs about $27) and time that we would have spent waiting for a plumber.

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Comments

  1. I could have used this tip about 15 years ago when I had a swamp cooler.

    It's always good to know how to do things for yourself - thanks for the photos and the tutorial.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Having no idea what so ever what a swamp cooler is, but admire John for being such a handy and thoughtful guy!
    Hope you can stay cool again. (while I turn up the heat over here...)

    ReplyDelete
  3. What a great job you guys did! Our air conditioner -- not a swamp cooler -- went out yesterday afternoon around 3PM. Around 3PM today the AC man came and everything is better again! Your task was much easier and much less expensive!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi, i have traditional air conditioner. But looks like a good project to learn. Glad you were able to fix it.

    ReplyDelete

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