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Thursday Thoughts: Be Nice!

My two oldest girls had the same kindergarten teacher.  This teacher had only one classroom rule:  Be nice.  She figured that one rule covered nearly all situations, and I have to admit, her classroom operated smoothly.  

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Unfortunately, not everyone had the advantage of learning from my daughters' kindergarten teacher, and some adults have not taken to heart the simple rule of "Be nice."

I have a really good story to illustrate this, but unfortunately, I think it would not be very nice of me to relate it in detail.  I'll just say that when oldest daughter went to the animal shelter last week to rescue the cat, she wasn't the only one interested in the cat.  The women who were not first in line had a different interpretation of the rules of waiting in line, and thought they should receive the cat.  They were not very happy, to put it mildly, when the shelter officials told them that my daughter would be the one taking the cat home. They had some "choice words" for my daughter.

I feel sorry for them, in a way, but I also feel bad that my daughter heard such hurtful things.  However, she thinks that having "Leela" makes it all worth it.




Thanks for daughters, cats, and kindergarten teachers.


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Comments

  1. Good grief. I'm sorry your daughter had to take the brunt of these women's bad manners. I am glad the shelter workers backed up your daughter, despite the angry women. I'm guessing they had some choice words for the shelter people, too.
    Can't say I'd ever want a hairless cat, that's why God made us all different. Even hairless cats need a home. :)

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  2. I like the concept of that being the only rule "be nice". Had me thinking that maybe it does cover all scenrios? Happy to hear you daughter got the cat, although sorry she had to interact with "not so nice" ppl in order to do so.

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  3. Some people just don't know how to be nice! I have a t-shirt with Thumper and his saying on it. I'm so glad your daughter got Leela. Twiggy, Twursula and Shebee are glad for Leela, too! Leela wouldn't have liked it living with those mean people.

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  4. A great lesson your daughter's teacher taught them. Unfortunately the other women were not taught the same manners. I am glad the animal shelter gave Leela to her. I am sure Leela will love her new home! Congrats!

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  5. Why would they think they should be favored if they were not the first in line to be approved for adoption? Strange.

    ReplyDelete

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