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Monday Morning in the Kitchen: How to Peel a Pomegranate

Do you enjoy fresh pomegranates, but dislike the hassle of actually getting at the fruit?  Removing the edible parts seemed a tedious task, until I learned a simple way.
Start by partially filling a bowl with cool water.  Holding the fruit over the water, carefully cut a pomegranate in half.  Submerge one half in the water, with the peel facing upwards.  Using your thumbs (I only have one in the photo, since I was holding the camera with my other hand), gently press on the rounded part. 


The membranes, as well as the arils will pop out into the water.  The pith floats, but the juicy sacs sink to the bottom. 

Please ignore the yellow in the photo; it's my attempt to fix a reflection from the light above.
Now gently pour off most of the water, and the inedible floating parts will pour off, too.  Then pour the remaining water and juicy sacs through a colander or strainer, and only the yummy arils remain.   

By using this method, you will quickly release the arils from the pomegranate, and the juice will not stain your fingers. 

 



 
Thanks for fresh, seasonal fruit.








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Comments

  1. Wow, passed up buying some on the weekend as I hate peeling them. Will definitely have to try this method. Thanks for sharing!

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  2. Oh, we will definitely be trying this! My hubby usually does the peeling and picking, until he is left with a big bowl full of the little juice berries! But it takes forever! Thanks a bunch!

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  3. Wow - I will have to try this. I think this is the smallest pomegranate that I have ever seen!! Did this come from your garden?

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    Replies
    1. Yes, this pomegranate came off our tree. We planted the tree a few years ago, so it is still growing and getting established. Some of the fruit was larger than in the photo, but I didn't think to take a picture until I was almost done peeling fruit.

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  4. Well, first, that is so cool that you have your own pomegranate tree! Second, thanks so much for sharing such an easy method to the once dreaded task of removing those delicate little taste bud thrillers!

    I hope your holiday season is going well, Kristi, for you and your family!

    Carol

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