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Tuesday Time to Tackle: Tiered Tray Tutorial

After seeing so many pinterest posts about making tiered trays from plates and candlesticks, I decided I would try.  I found some interesting plates at garage sales and thrift stores, and also some glasses (in lieu of candlesticks).  According to directions I had read online, all I needed to do was superglue the glasses to the plates, and voila--a beautiful, one-of-a-kind functional item.

While completing this project, I had flashbacks to junior high.  In seventh grade, we got to choose an elective each semester.  There were only 3 elective choices:  home economics, shop, and art.  I took home ec and shop because I did not want to take art.  I was convinced it would ruin my GPA.  Art frustrated me.  I equated art to drawing, and I knew my drawings didn't look realistic.  (It never dawned on me that maybe I could learn how to be artistic.) 

Over the years, I've somewhat let go of my perfectionist tendencies.
However, while supergluing plates and glasses, I realized that some "easy" projects still can frustrate me.  So, in case anyone else out there is planning on picking up the superglue, let me tell you what I've learned.

The first thing I learned was that glasses do not always have level tops.  Don't attempt to use uneven items for this project, or your cupcakes (or whatever) might just slide off the tray. 

Secondly, the bottom of your plate or tray might have a raised part.  This might prevent a good bond from forming.


See that center ring?  It didn't quite match up to the glass I was using.  It took me a while to figure out why the superglue was failing me.  Luckily, I had other plates.

The third thing I learned was that it isn't always easy to center the plates on the glasses, and vice versa.  (I learned the mark on the back of plates isn't always centered!)





Oh well.  Although my finished products demonstrate a bit of whimsy with their lopsidedness, I think they will do.   John says once the trays are loaded up with cupcakes, no one will notice.

Nice guy.  He always says the right things.

Care to share any of your "this is harder than it looks" stories?


 Thanks for the opportunities in life that give me a chance to learn to laugh at myself.

Comments

  1. John is right, but YOU will probably always see it.....lol! I made some of those hurricanes on pedestals (tall clear vases & clear glass candle sticks from the $Store) a while back, & one of them was slightly off, & that darn thing always bugged me. Fortunately for me, I used a hot glue gun instead of the E6000 glue that was recommended, so I was able to take the pieces apart & start over. I really like that whole tiered look that you've got going on!
    CAS

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  2. You know what Kristi, this would be great beside the sewing machine with all those little things that we need close by - a seam ripper, seam gauge, small scissors, etc. And if you put a small turntable on the bottom plate, even better! I think I even have an old spice holder at home that I might could use for the base. I love repurposing. :) blessings, marlene

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  3. How fun! I just found you on the Aloha Blog Hop! Stop by and follow back at http://sassyshopperreviews.blogspot.com/ when you can!

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  4. Oh Kristi, that is just too funny! Thanks for all the tips...I am on the lookout for the perfect plates and glasses for this project and it is good to know what you told us. Thanks and they do look great by the way!

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  5. I was going to say something similar to John. I think when you load the plates up with cupcakes, it will look very nice. Good job!

    I ought to actually try something I've pinned. hehe :)

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  6. Really the best tutorial is one that points out common things that can go wrong. The pictures of your wonky designs probably inspire us all to try fun things no matter the result. And yes, with food/stuff on it you will never notice and if someone does, say, SURPRISE you win the prize for having an eagle eye...!

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  7. What a neat project and great to use up all those odd plates and stuff. Thanks for all the tips on what can go wrong!

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  8. Love this idea. I want to try it!

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