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Sunday Musings of the Spirit: Speaking in Church

Well, I've been asked to speak in church today.  For those of you unfamiliar with what services are like in an LDS (Mormon) church, let me explain.  Our sacrament meeting (worship service) consists of hymns, prayers, partaking of the sacrament (communion), and two or three speakers.  As we do not have paid clergy, the members of each congregation speak instead of a preacher.  Often there will be a youth speaker (a 12-18 year old who speaks for 3-5 minutes), followed by 2 adults who speak for 15-20 minutes each. A couple of weeks ago, I was asked if I would speak today on the topic of honoring parents. 

Every time I prepare to speak, I gain insights that I didn't have previously.  What hit me this time was a deeper appreciation of how loving our Heavenly Father is.  The commandments are given not just arbitrarily,  but truly for our benefit. Even I, as an imperfect parent, have the best interest of my children in mind when I offer advice.  A perfect Heavenly Father gives commandments that bless us.  Why would we not want to honor him by demonstrating our love through obedience? 

If you attend church, what are your services like? 

Thankful thought:  Thanks for good parents, who always demonstrate their love, and thanks for our Heavenly Father and Jesus Christ, who are perfect examples of love.

Comments

  1. I know you'll do a wonderful and thoughtful job this morning. I think you might be interested in a blog I visit often Mennonite Girls Can Cook http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/ so many wonderful, prayerful devotionals and fantastic recipes too.

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  2. Our worship services are a mix of new praise music (because we have a band) and older hymns. The words to the songs are projected on a screen in the front. We start with a welcome from the Pastor with comments of the week's activities and changes not in the bulletin. Then a time to greet everyone, then remain standing for three loud praise songs. Then a prayer by the Pastor, and a piano hymn led by Laura who is the best singer in church. Then a children's time where they go to the front for a short object lesson or song. We sing again during collection plate passing and sing another hymn, all piano/organ. Then we settle in for sermon on the bible, about 30 min. and we are in Genesis right now. We are asked something to learn by next sermon (this week: how many children did Abraham have), then sing a closing hymn. Time elapsed is 1 hr 30 min. Before worship is an hour of Sunday school, which really is bible study for young and old alike. There is a ten minute break in between. This is an independent Baptist church in a small Iowa town.150 attend each week, and the town size is 4000 people. There are three other larger churches and 4 smaller churches of 20 or under members in this town.
    It was a big deal when the band started ten years ago. Now I'd miss them if it wasn't part of the service. And yes, Father and Jesus are the absolute best examples of what should be.

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  3. I'm a Methodist currently volunteering at a mission in south Louisiana. Here at the mission on Thursday evenings we have a Vesper service, a short service with two or three hymns, a 5-10 minute message from one of our volunteers, a time of sharing the blessings our volunteers have felt during their time here, and communion. On Sundays I attend a small local church that has a traditional service of hymns with a 30 minute sermon. It's really small so when we "pass the peace" (greet each other) we greet each person individually - I love that. At home I attend a contemporary worship service with about 250 people. We have a band and singers who do a super job. We also have two traditional services at this church, but at all three services our pastor gives the sermon. God made each one of us different from everyone else - isn't it wonderful that we can each worship in a way that best meets our needs! blessings, marlene

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  4. Catholic, ordinary form of Mass, in a rural small town where the priest has goats behind the church, a small white clapboard structure barely big enough for the congregation to all sit. We have Sunday and Sat night service plus morning Mass at 8 AM for those that don't have to take off for work. I visited through Sew Many Ways FaFF hop.

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