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Ten Things of Thankful: General Conference Edition

A photo, taken last year, of the back of yellow-lab Drexel's head, as he watches a session of General Conference on TV
Last weekend was General Conference for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Twice a year, in April and in October, I watch church from my couch, as I listen to four (2-hour) general sessions of conference over two days.  As you might imagine after binge-watching so much, I come away with great appreciation for the messages I've heard. For today's TToT, I'd like to share some of the messages that stood out to me. I'm thankful to have heard:

1. Ulisses Soares' advice concerning those who do not think/act/live like we do:
"It is hard to understand all the reasons why some people take another path. The best we can do in these circumstances is just to love and embrace them, pray for their well-being, and seek for the Lord's help to know what to do and say. Sincerely rejoice with them in their successes; be their friends and look for the good in them. We should never give up on them but preserve our relationships. Never reject or misjudge them. Just love them!"
2. Becky Craven's counsel:
"We can rationalize all we want, but the fact is, there is not a right way to do the wrong thing!"
3. Brook P. Hales comforting reminder:
"We have the assurance that in His own way and in His own time, Heavenly Father will bless us and resolve all of our concerns, injustices, and disappointments." 
4. Dieter F. Uchtdorf's summary of our responsibility:
"Yours is to love God and love your neighbors, His children. 
 "Believe, love, do."
5. W. Christopher Waddell's assurance that even our little efforts can make a difference:
"There may be other times when we recognize a need but feel inadequate to respond, assuming that what we have to offer is insufficient. To do just as He did, however, is to minister by giving what we are capable of giving and to trust that the Lord will magnify our efforts to bless 'our fellow travelers on this mortal journey.'"
 6. Henry B. Eyring's teachings on the power of prayer:
"Even when family members are not living in the home, prayer can build bonds of love. Prayer in the family can reach across the world."
 7. M. Russell Ballard's words of hope even in a troubled world:
"But even though we cannot control those external forces that impact our lives here on earth, as we strive to become faithful disciples of the Lord Jesus Christ, we can find peace, joy, and happiness despite the worldly troubles that swirl around us."
8. Takashi Wada's testimony that the value of scriptures:
". . .when we struggle with our own identity and lack of self-esteem, the 'pleasing word of God' in the scriptures will help us know who we really are and give us strength beyond our own."
9. Jeffrey R. Holland's advice (the topic was punctuality for church services, but could apply to many other things):
". . .an occasional tardiness is understandable, but if the ox is in the mire every Sunday, then we strongly recommend you sell the ox or fill the mire."
10. Russell M. Nelson's reminder of the everlasting love of Jesus Christ:
"Ever since Adam and Eve were expelled from the Garden of Eden, Jesus the Christ has offered His mighty arm to help all who choose to follow Him. Repeatedly, scriptures record that despite all kinds of sins from all kinds of people, His arms are outstretched still."

I've reached 10, but have barely made a dent in the conference talks of the weekend. If you'd like to read, watch, or listen to any of the talks from General Conference, they can be found at this link

In addition, I just have to add a couple more things: I'm thankful for the bravery and strength of my youngest daughter. She asked me to write and post her story for her. If you haven't had a chance to read it, please take a minute to do so. She's helping break down the stigma of mental illness. 

And, as always, I'm thankful for John. He's just an all-around good guy.

What are you thankful for this week? Do you have a saying or scripture that you turn to when you need a boost?

You are invited to join with the other Ten Things of Thankful participants; the more, the merrier! Link up below, and visit the other bloggers. 

Messy Mimi's Meanderings
The Prolific Pulse
The Wakefield Doctrine
A Season and a Time
Backsies is What There is Not
Viola's Daily Musings
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Click here to enter

Comments

  1. Excellent wisdom.

    "Sell the ox or fill the mire." That's one i want to remember especially. Too many people i know just don't choose to be on time, to church and other places. Most of the time, even if they disagree, it's a choice.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I saw a tweet that someone sent after hearing the advice about the ox and the mire that basically said, "I think Jeffrey Holland just told us to get a new minivan!" LOL You are right, though, most of the time, punctuality is a choice.

      Delete
  2. The common thread here: 1 Corinthians 13:13 "But the greatest of these is love."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, I definitely got that from General Conference!

      Delete
  3. Believe, love, do. Kind of covers it all, doesn't it?

    ReplyDelete
  4. The conference messages are a feast for the soul.

    John is an all-around good guy!

    ReplyDelete
  5. I'm with Mimi on the 'if the ox is in the mire'.
    (Although I must add my own enjoyment of it as writing, this little phrase is everything we strive for in writing (imo): evocative, engaging and possessed of an internal rhythm such that the words flow. very cool)
    Being consistently late for an event with an established timetable kinda says something about the individual's investment in attending.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, I agree with your assessment of the ox and the mire. Though, of course, Jeffrey Holland did not invent that phrase, his counsel on selling the ox or filling the mire is a good illustration of his talent with wording. I enjoy both his advice and the way in which he presents it.

      Delete

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