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Six Sentence Stories: Letter

I applaud Ivy's ability to choose prompt words.  Once again, I could draw on personal experience to come up with a Six Sentence Story. This week's prompt:  Letter. 


Our family gathered around the telephone in the living room, and assured the oldest son on the other end of the line that he was on speakerphone. 

He read, "Dear Elder_______, You are hereby called to serve as a missionary of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  You are assigned to labor in the Japan Tokyo mission."

Cheers erupted, and emotions ran high, as we realized that our son would be serving his mission in the same country where John had served.  

Though both oldest son and John have completed their missions now, remembering the opening of the mission call letter still brings a thrill.  

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Thanks for missions, no matter where served.


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Comments

  1. So did they have similar experiences? Is the missionary thing standard practice? Thanks for linking this up Kristi! Always questions sorry!:)

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    1. I don't mind questions! John served in rural areas, and our son served in urban areas 30 years later, but there were definitely similarities, too. They both spent their days talking to people (in Japanese) about Jesus Christ and the church. As for whether or not missions are "standard practice," all young men who are physically/mentally/emotionally capable to do so, are encouraged to serve a mission, but serving a mission is an individual decision. Young women and older couples can also serve. When someone decides they want to serve a mission, they complete paperwork with the help of their bishop and stake president, then they wait for a letter from Salt Lake City informing them of their assignment. It's always an exciting day to find out where and when a missionary is going, and what language (if any) they will be learning.

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  2. Wow! That is great that they went to the same place! Does that happen often?

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    1. It's not unheard of, but it isn't super common, either. John actually got called to Osaka, while our son went to Tokyo, but close enough! :-)

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  3. Great Six!
    the economy of the telling*


    *lol…I'm into believing that if I analyze or otherwise try to figure out what makes the good stories good, I'll improve my own skills
    … er, thanks!

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    1. Thanks. I felt like I left out so much, but I think the most important parts fit into the 6 sentences.

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  4. That is incredible! I love that you were able to use the prompt to tell a personal and uplifting story.

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    1. Thanks. As long as I can think of a true story, I'll try to keep telling those. It gives me a chance to document family history for my kids and grandkids (and anyone else who wants to read!) :-)

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  5. How long did they work in Japan?

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    1. John served at a time when the missionaries only served for 18 months; our son served for 2 years.

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  6. Thank you for sharing Kristi. A lot of us, myself for sure, first think to write fiction. This was an excellent prompt for a very nice, real life story. How cool John and your son served in the same country! Does that happen often? Or was it coincidence?

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    1. It's not super common, but it's not unheard of, either. It was very cool, though. After our son completed his 2-year mission, John and I traveled to Japan to meet him there. It was so nice to watch John's Japanese language skills come back to him, and to see our son, so fluent in the language and culture. John and our son were able to show each other (and me) the different places they served. Probably my favorite part was meeting some of the people my son taught, and having them tell me how much they appreciated my son's service. It made my mom heart proud.

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  7. I am sure that both of them were proud of their shared experience.

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  8. It is always exciting to receive an awaited letter and share good news with loved ones. The personal aspect of the story is what made it so interesting. You must be so proud of the missionary service of both your son and your husband.

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  9. I love your stories and I learn things from the comments, too. Your story made me think of 2 missionaries that I met when I was living in a very small town in Michigan many years ago. They were so nice but I have to think they would have had a lot more fun in Japan! A town with a population of 8000 and lots of snow, isn't the most fun place to be sent.

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    1. You'd be surprised. It seems that all missionaries come to love their missions. They spend so much time giving service, that they grow to love their missions, no matter where they serve. It's truly a life-changing experience.

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  10. Very nice, Kristi. I wondered if this would be the letter experience you would share.

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  11. Great job, Kristi! Two years? I guess I thought missions only lasted a year. That's a long time! Did he or John know any Japanese before they went over?

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    1. Two years is the standard time for young men. For a brief time in the early 80s, missions were 18 months, so that's why John's was shorter than our son's. Neither had studied Japanese previously, but they were fluent in speaking when they returned.

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  12. Wow, such dedication. Lovely real life story!

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