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Throwback Thursday: My Aunt Bonnie

I've never met my Aunt Bonnie.  I don't remember exactly when I learned about her, but I think it was when my mom told me not to play "My Bonnie Lies Over the Ocean" on the piano for my grandma.

Bonnie was my dad's only sister.  She was the baby of the family.  My grandparents rarely spoke of her; I think their loss was just too painful.  

Judging from the photos I have of her, Bonnie was a delightful girl. 




I would love to know what Bonnie and the dog were thinking in this photo!



Bonnie died when she was seven years old, just nine days after her birthday.   Her school class was preparing for a Christmas concert, and she tried to help her teacher move the piano.  Tragically, the piano tipped over, and Bonnie died.  


I believe that families can continue beyond this life, and I look forward to meeting my Aunt Bonnie someday. 

Which of your relatives are you looking forward to meeting?

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Thanks for families.

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Comments

  1. I can see why Bonnie's tragic death would be so upsetting to your grandparents. I can only imagine how the accident affected the teacher's life, too. It's very sad.

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    1. Yes, I'm sure the teacher was devastated, too.

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  2. It's good they had these precious photos! Sad story!

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    1. I think I was an adult before I saw a photo of Bonnie. I'm glad that they had photos, too.

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  3. Oh my goodness. How tragic! She was an adorable little girl. You'll enjoy meeting her someday, I'm sure.
    I look forward to meeting my grandfather. He died of a heart attack when my mom was a teenager.

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    1. Oh, that must have been really hard for your mom. I bet your grandpa's looking forward to meeting you, too!

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  4. How very sad for everyone. Your grandparents must have been devastated. I think if I could meet just one relative it would be my real grandmother. She died when my mother was about 5 so I know very little about her as a person. Wish I did.

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    1. Your poor mom! I can see that you wouldn't have much information about your grandma, since she died when your mom was so young.

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  5. That is indeed a tragedy. What a terrible event to have to grieve, especially for your grandparents and that teacher. I absolutely love those photos! I think I would love to meet my great grandmothers. I was fortunate enough to know two of them, but I wish I knew the other two, too. Tough, strong women, all.

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    1. How lucky you were to know two great-grandmothers! Certainly understandable that you'd want to meet the others as well.

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  6. What a tragedy for your family and the school as well, your aunt Bonnie is beautiful - somehow I can see the family resemblance ( I think) I would love to meet them all the relatives I knew and the relatives i did not know. My mom's younger sister Aunt Francis I met her when I was 4 when we were visiting in Italy and she washed my hair with peroxide lightening it a bit...:)

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    1. I bet that your relatives--known and unknown--will be equally delighted to meet you! What a family reunion that will be!

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