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Friday Family History: I Hope I'm Nicer Now

My little sister arrived on the scene when I was four and a half years old.  (Remember when ages were stated in half-years?) 

Because we were so far apart in age, sometimes I felt a little put-out when my mom asked me to play with my sister.  My sister always wanted to play "Little People".  We would get out the Fisher Price people--not the chunky ones that dot the store shelves now, but the skinny, choking-hazard ones made back in the olden days--and separate them into families.  I fear the Little People had a fairly humdrum existence; I don't remember any of the plots we imagined for them.  I do remember tiring of the game much sooner than my little sister did.


Of course, sometimes we played things other than "Little People," but even then my sister's endurance seemed to outlast mine.  One day, I came up with a great idea, one that would keep my sister busy and allow me a bit of peace.  We would play Hide and Go Seek, just as we had many times in the past, but this time, I decided to expand the boundaries without telling my sister.  While she counted to 100, I went to our next-door neighbors house to play with kids my own age.  I enjoyed 30 minutes or so of freedom, until my mom called me home.  She did not seem to appreciate the perfectness of my plan.  Good-bye, Hide and Seek; Hello, Little People. 

Now, my sister and I each have our own batch of little people.  (Of course, since I am so much older, my little people are mostly grown.) We live in opposite corners of the country, and I wish getting together were as easy as yelling, Ollie Ollie Oxen Free!

Thanks for my little sister.  (And my little brother, too.)


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Comments

  1. How cute! I was always made to play with my little brother too....now I wish I could!

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  2. Hi Kristi! I love your post. It rings so true for me. My baby sister is 6 years younger and I admit I was sometimes mean to her. We laugh about it now and I tell her I am so sorry! We are so close now and I wish I could see her more.

    Thanks for sharing!

    Linda at The French Hens Nest

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  3. Oh my gosh, I haven't seen these little people in years! Sometimes the simpler the toy is the better! These kids now a days have way, way to much! All we had back in the days were Raggedy Ann dolls, and little people, and our bikes! We played outside for hours it seemed! Now a days it seems like kids only want to play video games so sad!!! I wish I could re-live my child hood day's

    Thanks so much for reminding me of how lucky we were. Have an EXCELLENT WEEK-END!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Great post! So glad I found your site via Sew Many Ways. Sounds like we have a lot it common: My 'quarter-century' anniversary is coming up next month...we belong to the same church and both enjoy Family History...among other things, I'm sure. I'll be visiting often!

    ReplyDelete
  5. I know exactly what you mean. My sister was the same way. Now my children are young adults and hers are still small. I miss her because we live four hours away. Found you over @ Find a Friend Friday.
    crosson5.blogspot.com

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  6. The only thing worse than being to far apart is being to close together. I was only a year and 2 weeks older than my sister yet I was the oldest so I was responsible for everything and got blamed for everything - most of which wasn't my fault! Just stopping by from the Say it Saturday Linky Party and it would be great if you would do the same!

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  7. Will it make you feel better if I tell you I have no memory of this Hide and Seek game? I do, however, remember an argument where I insisted that *I* would never get tired of playing Little People, no matter how old I got. And I remember my shock and dismay on the day I found myself telling our younger brother that no, I didn't want to play Little People because it was boring.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Your version of hide and seek is hilarious! I say that because I am not your mother or sister. :)
    My kids get to play with those little people, too, since my mother-in-law kept some from when my husband was a child. Such great toys back then.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I love that version of hide and seek as a grandma who needs to sit in her recliner a bit longer than the kids seem necessary :) I wonder if I could get away with it? Hmmm....thanks for linking up with me at Say It Saturday.

    ReplyDelete

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