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Monday Menu Musings

After a month of menu planning, I've come to the conclusion that I'm not very good at this.  Rather, I do fine on the planning end but I struggle with the execution of the plan.  I'm way too fickle.  Cold, windy, cloudy day with a main dish salad planned?  Not happening.  That is soup weather.  Spicy dish planned and someone has a migraine?  Nope.  Time for scrambled eggs.  Probably my best worst reason for a plan change:  I don't wanna. 

Can you believe I still yet haven't tried that yummy-sounding soup recipe from my mom?  (Sorry, Mom!)  I'm almost embarrassed to put up a plan for this week.  Curry, spaghetti, and soup again?!

I think what I will do is forget the blogged plan, and start the Monday Menu recap for the past week.  So, starting next week, I will report what we ate at dinner the prior week.  That way I don't have to stress if life happens in conflict with a planned menu.  Just keeping it real.  :-)

Last week, I mentioned the "52 Method" from Chef Tess.  I'm still intrigued by this and want to try it.  Additionally, though, I think that it is important to have on hand a generous supply of chicken noodle soup, macaroni and cheese, jello, rice, applesauce, etc.--foods which sick people would tolerate.  (No, we aren't ill, I'm just trying to be prepared.)

Thankful thought:  Thanks for time--time to try new things, evaluate, and try something else.

Comments

  1. I read some of Chef Tess' blog and I am interested in the dry pack meals. I have all kinds of dehydrated and freeze dried foods in my storage. I wish we lived closer. If you decided to make these, I would offer to join/help you. Let me know if you try this and how it went.

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