Saturday, September 24, 2011

General Relief Society Meeting...Or, Lessons from the Forget-Me-Not

I just got back from watching the broadcast of the General Relief Society Meeting.  (Click here to watch the General Relief Society Meeting.

The entire meeting was uplifting, of course, but I particularly enjoyed the final speaker. President Dieter F. Uchtdorf's talk centered around the small blue Forget-Me-Not flower being a symbol of what makes life joyful and sweet.  He mentioned that each of the five petals could represent things we should not forget:

1. Do not forget to be patient with yourself. 
We are generally very patient and kind to others, but not always to ourselves.  Sometimes we compare ourselves to others--our weaknesses to their strengths--and thus never seem to measure up.

2. Do not forget the difference between a good sacrifice and a foolish sacrifice. 
One example of a good sacrifice is losing sleep to help comfort a child who is having a nightmare. One example of what could be a foolish sacrifice is staying up all night to finish sewing an accessory for an outfit.

3. Do not forget to be happy now.
Pres. Uchtdorf referenced Charlie and the Chocolate Factory in cautioning us not to wait for our golden ticket, but to find joy in the ordinary moments that make up life.

4. Do not forget the "why" of the gospel.
The gospel is not an obligation, but a pathway.  The "what" and the "how" of obedience marks the way, and keeps us on the path, but the "why" will inspire and uplift us.

5. Do not forget that the Lord loves you. 
You are not forgotten. 

I loved the optimism, love, and encouragement of that message. 

Thankful thought of the day:  Thanks to those who organize and make possible meetings like the one tonight.  On a local scale, we had our stake Relief Society presidency arrange for a dinner prior to the broadcast.  Tables and seats were set up, decorations were in place, and food was prepared. On the global scale, well...the amount of effort that goes into the global organization of the meeting--the speakers, the music, the taping of the broadcast, the translation into many languages, etc--is rather mind-boggling.  Thanks to all!

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