Skip to main content

Ten Things of Thankful: Good-Bye, July Edition


A quail perches on a wooden support and keeps watch for predators

Summer 2020 reminds me of childhood summers: my calendar is open, my responsibilities are few, and the hot days stretch out seemingly endlessly. The months, however, pass quickly, and here we are in August. Parents and teachers are trying to figure out what back-to-school will look like, while children are trying to enjoy the last days of freedom. There is much to be thankful for, even as the pandemic continues.

I'm thankful for:

1. Looking back over the two years we've been in this house and noticing the changes we've made in the backyard.

Before and after collage of the backyard in August 2018 and August 2020. The land was pretty bare and wild in 2018; now the land has been purposely contoured, there is a fence, sprinkler system, fire pit, dry creek bed, garden area, and new planting bed.


A view from the top of the yard: dry creek bed and planter box of red twig dogwood on the left, fire pit in the middle, and garden boxes on the right.

2. Bargain price on mulch, which came in handy for the new beds. (Check your local Walmart! Bags were marked at $0.75-$1.50, depending on color.)


3. A million ways to eat summer squash. (Much like shrimp, I guess.)

4. Dyanne for suggesting roasting corn in the oven. So easy, so yummy! (The corn was store-bought; we're still waiting for our home-grown corn to ripen.)

5. Noom app. I'm down 7 pounds in two weeks. Plenty more to go, but it's a start.

6. Similarly, after stopping and starting the couch to 5K program a few times, I've started again. It's harder without the motivation of actually being signed up for a race, but John and I picked a date we will run a 10K of our own down a nearby canyon. It's a really nice run, and I'm motivated to be ready for it.

7. Zoom. Around 14 (!) years ago, a group of friends started a lunch group that met about monthly. A lot can (and has) happened in 14 years, and not all of those women still live in the area. Thanks to Zoom, we can still virtually gather and share in each others' lives. Thankful for Zoom; more thankful for friends.

8. Seeing projects come together. We are getting closer to having the trailer ready to sell. I'm thankful for Trailer Brothers who have made the job much easier for us.

9. Realizing while grocery shopping that I don't have to be tempted to purchase raspberries, because I have my own growing in my backyard.

10. John. He puts in the heavy work on our projects. I have ideas, take photos, and "help." 

What do you do in the summertime?  What are you thankful for today? 

Joining the Ten Things of Thankful this week:


You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!

Click here to enter

Comments

  1. Excellent yard reconstruction. (I really like the idea of the dry creek bed, something about the larger scale projects I enjoy).
    Technology has offered solutions to situations that surely none of us anticipated, even a few years ago.
    Have a good week ahead.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The large scale projects make a big impact. Next up will probably be terracing the slope, so John doesn't have to mow.

      Delete
  2. I like Zoom too. It is convenient to use for meetings and parties!
    You made a big improvement in your yard! I love it.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Your yard is beautiful! Great on the loss! I'm fighting the good fight!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Wow, your yard has really changed in the past year! Very impressive.
    If you are only going to be cooking a couple of ears of corn, fixing them in the microwave and removing the husks after cooking is really quick. Four minutes per ear.
    Congratulations on the weight drop. I have been burning some calories from my weeding "exercises" but then putting the weight back on from some of my baking projects. HaHa.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I usually use my pressure cooker for corn; it's also quick. I'll have to try the microwave sometime, too. Thanks for the idea.

      Delete
  5. That is a huge accomplishment in 2 years! It all looks great, but the fire pit is my favorite. Looks so comfy :D Must be gorgeous at night with the stars above. Congrats on the 7!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The fire pit was all John's vision and work, and I agree with you, it is a great place to sit in the evenings.

      Delete
  6. Yes, I'm a huge fan of zoom too and am so grateful for it. I have a writers hour every morning on zoom where lots of writers come together to write . It's encouraging, energising and has motivated me to write more than I would have done during these last few months.
    gramswisewords.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A writers' hour would be motivating! Thanks for stopping by!

      Delete

Post a Comment

Conversations are so much nicer when more than one person does the talking. :-) Please leave a comment and let me know your thoughts; I'd love to hear from you!

Popular posts from this blog

Ten Things of Thankful: Dad's Influence Edition

Infant-me, sitting on the wood floor, looks up at my dad, who is sitting on a brown sofa and smiling down to me Here in the United States, it is Father's Day weekend. I did not realize until recently that Father's Day was not officially made a holiday until 1972. 1972! Now, while I realize that many people consider 1972 eons ago, I do not. I'm glad that fathers have a day of recognition now, because they surely deserve acknowledgement.  I thought for this week's Ten Things of Thankful post, I would list ten lessons I'm thankful my dad taught me. My dad is a teacher. Not only did he impart his knowledge to countless junior high aged kids throughout his career, he taught--and still teaches--my siblings and me. He is not a preachy teacher; he's a humble man whose lessons I feel like I learned through osmosis. When he would get home from work, we'd all sit down as a family for supper. Often, our phone would ring, and on the other end of the line would be a paren

Ten Things of Thankful: Summer Strawberries and Procrastinated Projects

A brilliantly-colored dark pink and purple fuchsia blossom You would think that by the time a person reaches my age, she would not be surprised by the passing of time, yet I find myself nearly constantly amazed that a certain amount of time has passed--whether that be a week, month, year, or couple of decades. Earlier this year, I planted a garden. Yesterday I harvested my first strawberry. Earlier this year, I also planted fuchsia starts, and now the flowers are blooming. How is that possible? (And why am I surprised?) Sometime around the turn of the century (and it still seems strange to use that phrase about the year 2000), we bought a circa 1935 dresser. It needed some TLC, but had a cool curvy front. This past week, I finally got around to applying some Restor-A-Finish and Feed-N-Wax, and now the dresser still looks old, but not dilapidated. I still need to apply some hide glue to some loose pieces, but I'm counting progress as a win. For as long as I can remember, I've be

Ten Things of Thankful: From Sunrise to Moonset

Cars and trucks on a highway travel toward the rising sun                                    John and I made a quick, task-oriented trip to California last week. We wore our masks and stayed at an acceptable social distance from others (which is hard for grandchildren to understand, but we mostly succeeded.) We're now home, and at the "I need a vacation to recover from my 'vacation' " stage, which makes sitting down to compose a TToT post a bit of a challenge. However, I know that I will feel better by the end of this post, so bear with me if you will.  1. I'm thankful that we had no problems with traffic going there or coming home. We left our hotel at about quarter to four on Friday morning. The early start, fewer families traveling this year, or, most likely, a combination of the two, made for an easy drive.  2. I'm thankful for books to help pass the time. We haven't actually finished yet (as I was reading aloud, and my voice can only last for so l