Skip to main content

Ten Things of Thankful: May Flowers, Continued, and Other Garden News

Ruffled white and lavender irises bloom 
When John and I moved into this house, we realized that our yard had quite a few iris plants. Most of the year, they look like giant, overgrown grass blades, but in May, they explode and fill the air with an intoxicating fragrance. This week, we've been enjoying their beauty.

1. I'm thankful for irises.

Monday afternoon, I went to the Red Cross to donate whole blood. 

2. I'm thankful that something that is so easy for me to do is actually helpful for someone.

I might have mentally said, "Yeah, yeah," when the phlebotomist gave me the instructions about avoiding exercise for the rest of the day. I knew I had raspberries and strawberries arriving that afternoon that would need to get planted. As soon as I got home, I started digging holes. I must admit that, even though I only needed a hand trowel, digging 70 holes when down a pint of blood took more energy than I would have expected. 

3. I'm thankful to have that project done!

A newly planted tiny strawberry plant

Earlier this spring, a master gardener had an online question and answer session on Facebook, then later a Zoom meeting about soil preparation. I was able to get a recommendation for a berry nursery that I hadn't ordered from before. It was a great recommendation! The berries from Nourse Farms did not disappoint. I was very impressed with their healthy, strong roots. Though the tops aren't much to look at right now, I fully expect the plants will establish themselves nicely.

4. I'm thankful for those who share knowledge.

Wednesday afternoon, another box of plants arrived on my porch, this time, 10 raspberry plants and 4 fruit trees from Raintree Nursery  John had previously dug the holes for the trees, and the ten little holes I needed to dig for the raspberries took no time at all. 

5. I'm thankful to have that project done!

A row of raspberry plants growing in raised garden beds
A newly-planted peach tree waits to leaf out
Anyone who has been around the Ten Things of Thankful blog hop for any length of time knows that we are a little lax about the number ten. Clark, one of the co-hosts,  will tell you about a book of secret rules (or secret book of rules) that allows for the number of items to differ from ten. In order to lead by example, I will end this post without getting to ten. If I individually counted the planted fruit trees (4), raspberry plants (30), and strawberry plants (50)--not to mention the irises-- I'd surpass 10. I'm sure there's a rule in the book somewhere that allows for that! 

However, I will count to 6, because I am also thankful (as I am each week), for John. He's an extraordinary digger-of-holes, builder-of-garden-boxes, installer-of-sprinklers, and mover-of-dirt. He definitely deserves a rest after all the work he has put into the yard this year!

What are you thankful for this week? You don't have to count to ten! 
You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!
Click here to enter

Comments

  1. Regarding #2, I am quite certain you inherited a few of your mother and my mother's genes, and just as certain that your kids are going to say someday, "You can't do that anymore." HaHa

    I am glad your plants were still alive after the delay in arriving. That is a lot of strawberry plants! Are they an everbearing variety?

    Those are gorgeous irises!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I suspect you are right about the genes. I've been wanting to try a somersault since you last shared that entry of Grandma's. Haven't done it yet, though. :-)

      The strawberries are two different varieties. One is June-bearing, and the other is everbearing.

      The irises smell as good as they look!

      Delete
  2. raspberries and strawberries...nice! I'm not big on raspberries, but I love blackberries!! I'm glad you didn't pass out after giving blood and doing that work. :-)

    Gotta love those side kicks of ours that do the honeydo's!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Raspberries are my favorite, but blackberries are good, too. I was hoping the berries would arrive on Friday instead of Monday, but schedules don't always cooperate.

      John has done a lot of honeydo's this year!

      Delete
  3. Oh, irises are truly beautiful and they smell good too! Thanks for sharing your thankfuls.

    ReplyDelete
  4. SR 7.3 [sub chap 5] (in point of fact) would be how I would cite the BoSR/SBoR
    Nicely done!

    Tried strawberries once. We did, at one time, have (wild) blueberry bushes, but never tried to cultivate them. The birds seemed to enjoy it.

    We've adopted a certain laissez-faire attitude on the garden... whoever eats it first (fauna or family) is welcome to it.

    Liked the raised bed garden (in photo).

    Have a good week.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I knew you would know the citation details! Thanks!

      I suspect that if we hope to harvest strawberries, we might need to cover the garden box with netting, but we'll see. Like you, we're pretty open to sharing, but we do hope to have some, too!

      I've heard that blueberries just don't do well here, so we didn't even try any. Our city celebrates Strawberry Days, so presumably strawberries grow well here, and last year I picked raspberries at a U-Pick place, so I have high hopes for the raspberries, too.

      Delete
  5. Just being thankful counts! After all, i think we are all training ourselves in gratitude and looking for things to be thankful for throughout the week, even if we don't always remember to get them written on the weekend.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! I agree, we are training ourselves, and the TToT helps us, no matter how many (or few) things we count each week!

      Delete
  6. 70 holes?! Wow! How long will it take before you get berries? Like a couple of years ? My great aunt planted probably 100 everbearing strawberry plants many, many years ago. Picking them was a pain, but there were strawberries all summer! We ate them over homemade ice cream!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Theoretically, we could get some later this year, but I'm not counting on any real harvest until next year. Half of the strawberries and about 2/3 of the raspberries I planted are everbearing varieties.

      Delete
  7. I think you were referring to rule 9.25 subsection g part 3 that states if Clark said it, it's probably good to go.

    ReplyDelete
  8. You're a lifesaver. Thank you for your blood donation.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Conversations are so much nicer when more than one person does the talking. :-) Please leave a comment and let me know your thoughts; I'd love to hear from you!

Popular posts from this blog

Ten Things of Thankful: Even in Times of Uncertainty

  A railroad switch point on the tracks at the Golden Spike National Historic Park There is a lot I don't know. I don't know who will lead the United States for the next four years (at the time I'm composing this post, that hasn't been determined yet.) I don't know when covid cases will stop rising in my state and start decreasing. I don't know how challenging situations will turn out. There is much uncertainty in life. Living in limbo-land is hard. It's emotionally exhausting. It can be immobilizing. My body seems to think chocolate is the answer, but I know that isn't a long-term solution. What do I need in times like these? I need to REMEMBER . 1. R esilience. People are resilient. I am resilient. I'm thankful for resilience. 2. " E ach Life That Touches Ours for Good." So many people, both those I know in "real life," and those I have only met virtually, have taught me, encouraged me, and been examples to me. I'm thankful

Ten Things of Thankful: August Arrives!

A wild sunflower shows its cheery yellow petals My teacher friends are preparing to return to the classroom, whatever that looks like in their district. In any other year, I would be getting excited about BYU's Education Week. 2020 isn't like any other year, though, is it? Ed Week has been postponed to a date TBA and changed to an online format. While I am happy that I am getting projects done around the house, and I'm generally content to live the life of a hermit, I'm literally dreaming of going to Disneyland, which makes me think I must be getting a little case of cabin fever. (I'm not usually a big dreamer, or if I am, I don't usually remember my dreams. This one was particularly funny, I thought: I was in line to get into Disneyland. In front of me in line were the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Elder Cook was having trouble and his ticket wasn't scanning. I said to the cast member, "He's OK. I can vouch fo

Ten Things of Thankful: Harvest Time Edition

  A harvest of beets, carrots, potatoes, and onions  Although I have come to love summer once again, I have always loved fall. As a child, I loved the excitement of back-to-school time. There was something so satisfying about checking off the required school supplies from the list, and the new clothes and shoes were waiting so patiently for the first day to arrive, so I could wear them. The air developed a crisp coolness, and soon it would be the holiday season.  I don't have new school supplies, nor do I have a new outfit in my closet, but I still love autumn. As an adult, September brings harvest time. I have been enjoying the bounty of the garden, and am taking mental note of what worked and what didn't, in preparation for next planting season. The temperatures are beginning the roller-coaster ride of changing seasons, and soon enough we will be celebrating holidays. One of those holidays, of course, is Thanksgiving, and what better way to prepare than to reflect back on thi