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Ten Things of Thankful: April is Here Edition!

Low-lying clouds float in the canyon between the mountains, while a red barn stands in the foreground
March came in like a lion, then the whole zoo took over! Snow and Corona and earthquakes, oh my! However, even though it snowed a little bit two nights ago, COVID-19 is still impacting daily life, and the nearby Army Depot decided to detonate old ammunition (which made it feel like we were experiencing aftershocks), there are still plenty of things to be thankful for. Here is what I have noticed this week:

1. Middle daughter's birthday. Though we are miles apart, we stay in touch via phone calls and mail.

2. General Conference weekend is this week. Last October, President Russell M. Nelson said "general conference next April will be not only memorable; it will be unforgettable." That is definitely the case, and it hasn't even started yet! The music has been pre-recorded, and no one will be in the Conference Center except for those who are speaking, saying the prayers, etc. I'm looking forward to the talks. It really is the best thing to binge-watch this weekend! Feel free to join me.

3. Warmer weather. Although we have had snow this week, we've also had some sunny, warmer days. 

4. Progress on the garden. John is making raised beds, plants and seeds have been ordered, and seedlings are starting to grow inside in preparation for transplanting later. 
The view from the fire pit patio looking west shows one completed garden box
5. A Zoom luncheon with friends.  This is the same group of women I would meet with when I lived in California. Several of us have moved since then. We gathered in our homes in Georgia, Utah, and California and caught up with each other's lives. It was so good to see everyone again!

6. I pulled off an April Fool's Day prank on John. A local bakery was offering (curbside pickup) of cupcakes that looked like Chinese take-out, so I ordered a couple ahead of time, told John I was doing my civic duty to help small-businesses stay afloat and I would be back with lunch, then brought home what looked like chow mein. I totally surprised him, too!
A cupcake baked inside a Chinese takeout box looks just like an order of chow mein
7. Messages on the walking trail. I don't know who wrote them, but it is nice to see friendly greetings.
A chalk message states, "We are stronger and smarter than COVID-19"
8.The chirping of birds in the trees, quail running all over my backyard and up the mountain, and bunnies hopping in the brush alongside the walking trail.
Quail scurry in the backyard
A bunny hides near some brush 

9. The plant that sprouted from an avocado pit a couple of years ago is getting huge leaves now. I never expected it to actually do as well as it is, but it seems to like its location on a south-facing window seat. 
An avocado leaf is as big as my hand

10. The Christmas cactus that is in full bloom, and all the little starts from it that are growing on my kitchen window sill.

An old Christmas cactus is covered in red blossoms

Starts from the big Christmas cactus root in pots on my kitchen window sill


11. (Because why stop at just 10?) John. If I have to be a hermit, I'm glad I'm a hermit with him. Also, for what it's worth, we've beaten the board game Pandemic the past two nights in a row, so hopefully that's a good omen. :-)

How are you? What are you thankful for this week? 

Joining this week:
The Prolific Pulse
MessyMimi's Meanderings
Recording Life Under the Radar
the Wakefield Doctrine
Carin's Gratitude
The Meaning of Me
A Season and a Time

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Comments

  1. Love your cacti, nature and the cupcake looks so good, i want one!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Those cacti are fabulous! I havent had much luck with them...so jealous.we had an avocado pit that became an indoor tree....loved that thing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm thinking our avocado might also become an indoor tree. If you have any growing tips, I'm all ears!

      Delete
  3. I'm liking Zoom. I use it now more than ever. Hangouts is OK too. Our group meetings now turned into online/virtual so both are so helpful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is nice to have options on how to stay in touch when we can't meet in person.

      Delete
  4. Tell me, (as I expect), that you and John did the stonework I see in the photo of the firepit patio. Aiyyee (Not simply the skill and labor, but the focus and patience that surely is a part of the process. Very nice.)
    We're beginning to see the signs of spring, if not the temperatures.
    Have as good a week as possible.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can't take credit for the stonework, but John did do all that work. I'm always impressed with how he can take an idea and make it a reality.

      Delete
  5. You have quite the mix of seasons! Lovely thankfuls!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Your plants are great! The longer I live in a house with no yard and no space to grow things, the more I want to grow things. And that's saying something because I do NOT enjoy gardening at all. Forbidden fruit syndrome? Perhaps.
    Love your photos and how great that you got to visit with your friends via Zoom!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I enjoy gardening, but also really appreciate plants that can tolerate some neglect/do well in the climate I live in. There's always a bit of a learning curve every time we move to a different state.

      Delete
  7. Your avocado is doing quite well I'd say. What a cute little bunny you have. Do they eat any of your flowers? What a sweet April Fools' Day trick. Yum.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I saw the bunny on my walk; I haven't actually seen any in my yard.

      Delete

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