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Seven Signs You Might Be Shopping in a Utah Costco

Shopping in a warehouse store carries a measure of familiarity to it, no matter where you are. The layout of the stores is basically the same, as is the selection of merchandise. However, there are subtle (and not so subtle) differences between stores. 

Recently, I moved from California to Utah. As I am Mormon, and have lived in Utah before when I was a student at BYU, I wasn't expecting too much difficulty adjusting to the new locale. However, when I went to Costco, I couldn't help but have that "something is slightly off" feeling. I started paying attention to the differences between the Costco I shopped at in California, and the Costco in Utah.

Seven Signs You Might Be Shopping in a Utah Costco

1. There are lots more kids in tow. In California, whenever I had all five of my children with me, we definitely stood out. That wouldn't have been a problem in Utah. I looked around while I was in the checkout line, and noticed big families everywhere. Four or more children was the norm, not the exception.

2. Forty-five pound buckets of whole wheat kernels are sitting next to big white buckets of rolled oats. In California, I never once saw wheat for sale.


Photo: Big white buckets (labeled "Lehi Roller Mills") of whole wheat kernels stacked in Costco
3. Hershey's Syrup is sold in seven-pound jugs. Mormons neither smoke nor drink (alcohol or coffee), so I guess what is left on the acceptable vice front is chocolate--lots of chocolate. 


Photo: Brown plastic jugs of Hershey's Syrup sit in white boxes
4. Alcohol and cigarettes are conspicuously missing. While in California it is hard to miss the alcohol section of Costco, or the locked cage holding the cigarettes, I couldn't see any sign of either alcohol or cigarettes at my local Costco in Utah.

5. That familiar red coffee grinding machine is gone, too. Though I don't drink the stuff, I must admit I will miss the smell of freshly ground coffee beans. In California, whenever anyone was using the grinder when I was exiting the building, I would take a deep whiff as I walked to the door. 

6. There are plenty of red (for the University of Utah) and blue (for Brigham Young University) shirts for sale. I'm partial to blue, so that's what I'll include in the photo.

Photo: A display of blue and grey BYU shirts at Costco
7. The book table includes copies of "Your Study of the Book of Mormon Made Easier." I can't say I have ever seen that in California.

Photo: Copies of "Your Study of the Book of Mormon Made Easier" on the book table at Costco. (Along with another title, "Forgotten Tales of Utah".)
Have you shopped at a Costco store in Utah? Have I missed other signs that should be included? What is unique in Costco in your state? I'd love to hear your comments!


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Comments

  1. I don't think Costco is in Wyoming, but I've shopped at a Sam's Club in Casper. I usually make one or two visits a year when the roads are clear of snow, one right before winter settles in the area.

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  2. I know what you mean about the differences. We noticed it when we moved from Virginia to Utah; and then again when we moved from Utah to Iowa where there is certainly a dearth of bulk food for sale in any stores.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Pretty soon everything will seem routine, I'm sure, but for now I'm having fun noticing the differences.

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  3. I've been mia on the blogs lately. Looking forward to hearing all about your life in Utah. It's interesting to hear about the differences. I've never really given it much thought. Now I kinda want to visit Costco. lol

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There is probably a lot to learn about marketing by visiting Costcos in different states, but I just found it interesting to observe.

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