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Thursday Thrift Store Find

I'm spending this week in Oregon.  As you might remember, I spent some time in Oregon earlier this year when my dad had heart surgery.  I stayed in my parents' home with my grandma, so my mom could be with my dad while he was in the hospital recovering.  I realized a little bit better then just how much energy goes into being a full-time caregiver to a person with Alzheimer's.  I decided then that I should come to Oregon more frequently, to provide a bit of help, or at least distraction.
My parents' live out in the country, on several acres.  Although my dad's recovery is complete, my mom isn't able to spend as much time as she used to in her flower beds.  Someone needs to be with Grandma all the time, and Grandma isn't physically able to accompany Mom outside all over the property.  So, youngest daughter and I have getting our hands dirty, pulling weeds and gathering fallen tree branches.  We won't be able to accomplish everything in this trip, but we can at least help a bit. 

Yesterday, though, Grandma wanted to go to the local day program for Alzheimer's patients.  What a wonderful program that is!  A small group of clients gather together in a room at the senior center for several hours of planned activity.  Art, music, movement, food, and conversation are always on the schedule.  Grandma doesn't attend every day, but when she wants to go, Mom takes her.  

With Grandma at her program, Mom decided to spend part of the day just having fun.  We checked out a local farmer's market that she hadn't been to before, and visited The Fussy Duck, a store selling self-proclaimed "funky junk."  Before we did any of that, though, we stopped by the thrift store at the front of the senior center.  We noticed this unusual pin, but didn't purchase it then:



As we drove away, we joked about that pin would be a good one to take to Antiques Roadshow, and how we'd even have a good story to accompany it:  "Well, we saw it in a thrift store, and it was marked $1.00, but the clasp was broken, so we didn't purchase it then."  When we returned in the afternoon to pick up Grandma, I asked Mom if I could buy the pin for her (Mom), and she agreed.

When we got home, I removed the pin from the paper, and noticed some engraving on the back.  Youngest daughter (the only one of us with good-enough eyes) was able to read "Trifari" for us.  A quick internet search taught us that what we purchased was not a broken-clasped coat pin, but an intact "fur pin."  Trifari is a well-respected name in jewelry, and the pin was a Alfred Phillipe design from about 1940.  Mom asked me, "Do you want the pin back?"  I assured her, "No, this just goes to show that it's possible to give really nice gifts for not much money!"  (Now if we can just find Mom a fur, so she can wear her pin.  :-)  )

Have you ever been surprised by a purchase you've made?

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Thanks for thrift store fun with Mom!

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Comments

  1. That is a great find! I'm glad you were able to get up to visit with your parents and grandma again. I"m sure they appreciate the visit as much as you do.

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  2. that is a beautiful pin! have a wonderful week! tell your mom to wear it well! :)

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  3. It's gorgeous! I would have purchased it, too.

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  4. Well, how wonderful!!! I was looking for something like that, for the fur stole I found in my mom-in-law her stuff when we had to clear the house. Her mom (Henks Granny) wore the fur stole for her daughter's (my mom IL) wedding. She had a pin on it, but not quite as beautiful as this one! Couldn't find that anymore though. Or; I could send your mom the fur stole, so she can wear it!!!

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  5. It is really pretty but I have never even heard of a fur pin -- never had a fur either! What a wonderful find and for only $1.

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  6. That's just beautiful, Kristi! If the value doesn't matter, you could always add a regular pin backing and your mom could wear it on lots of things.

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