Skip to main content

Struggling With My Views at Petsmart

You might remember that I recently posted about confident parenting.  We know our children, and we know what skills and knowledge would prove most useful to them.  We should celebrate successes and not worry about what others think.  Well . . . I still struggle with this. 

Yesterday, I stopped at Petsmart to buy dog food for Reno.  I was dressed in jeans and a T-shirt.  The T-shirt had on the front:  America 1776.  The cashier looked at me, and asked/said:  "1776.  Is that the date of the Army?  Or was it Navy?"  Even after I explained it meant the birth of our nation, she asked, "the flag?"  I reiterated, then tried not to act surprised when she explained to me that her major in college had nothing to do with history. 

Then I struggled with my feelings.  I do believe what I wrote in my confident parenting post, yet I found myself surprised that the English-speaking, college student/cashier did not know what I considered a fact of general knowledge.  I reminded myself that I have forgotten many facts in my lifetime, and I remembered all the nightmares I had after I received my college degree.  The dreams all had one recurring theme:  somehow I was a fraud, because I couldn't remember calculus.  Never mind the fact that I took calculus in high school.  According to my nightmares, if I don't remember how to work the problems now, I shouldn't have the college diploma (and probably not even the high school one, either.)

Anyway, it probably doesn't take a psycho-analyst to realize that I value education, yet struggle with defining what that means.  The good news, and what I constantly need to remind myself, is that each one of us has a lifetime to collect knowledge.  None of us will ever be able to learn everything that is available to us.  We get to pick and choose where our focus will be.  Even if we don't know something someone else considers a basic fact, that doesn't diminish what we do know.  And just as I would not want to be judged by someone who actually remembers calculus, I should not judge another person's lack of recollection of historical facts.  Do I want my children to understand and remember what 1776 means for this country?  Of course.  Is it the most important thing they will learn in their lifetime?  Of course not. 

I love seeing my children learn and work hard.  I smile along with them as they enjoy academic success, but their development of character traits such as determination, motivation, empathy, kindness, and love brings me even greater delight. 

So, to the cashier in Petsmart:  You showed curiosity, humility, and willingness to learn.  Note to self:  Until you have relearned calculus, and as long as the change is correct, don't worry about what a cashier may or may not know. 

Thankful thought:  Thanks for the time we have to learn. 

Comments

  1. I'm just going to imagine that her major in college is in Microbiology, with emphasis in molecular genetics! And we'll cut her some slack in the history department! lol

    Was the change correct? :o)

    ReplyDelete
  2. I love your thoughts on this and it reminds me to be a little more humble about judging others. Thanks.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Conversations are so much nicer when more than one person does the talking. :-) Please leave a comment and let me know your thoughts; I'd love to hear from you!

Popular posts from this blog

Never Give Up Hope

Twenty-three years ago, a beautiful little girl was born. From the get-go, she was sweet, sensitive, and rather shy. She has grown into a young woman of whom I am so proud. She has worked hard to overcome challenges, and recently told me she is trying to face her fears, and asked me if I would write her story and share it here on the blog, in hopes she can inspire others through their own struggles. Although I offered to publish an auto-biographical piece for her, she wanted me to write her story from my perspective. At her request, and with her approval of this post, I share the following:
The phone rang, and the social worker on the other end informed me that a baby girl had been born 10 weeks early and drug-exposed. She wasn't ready to be released from the medical facility where she was currently staying, but would we be interested in being her foster-to-adopt parents? Of course! When John and I filled out our paperwork, we indicated that we were comfortable with a premature bab…

Six Sentence Story: Burst

The moment the church organist started playing the introduction to the hymn, the precocious toddler girl stood up on the pew. Music just moved her, and she was doubly excited when she realized she recognized the tune. Though everyone around her was opening a hymnal and finding the right page, that was unnecessary for her. 
First of all, she couldn't read, but second, even if she could read, she didn't need the words; they were etched into her memory. Finally, the organist finished the introduction and the chorister signaled the congregation to begin, but while the rest of the church-goers sang, "Lord, dismiss us with thy blessing," the sweet little girl belted out, "Go tell Aunt Rhody." By the time she got to the line about the old grey goose being dead, all decorum was lost as those around her burst out laughing. 




This has been another Six Sentence Story. The blog hop is hosted by Denise of Girlie on the Edge each week. The rules are simple: write a six sent…

Six Sentence Story: Release

Her small brow furrowed in concentration as she carefully placed the wriggling worm on the little hook. 

"Ready, Daddy!" she called, and Daddy came over and helped her cast the line into the lake. To the amazement of both of them, soon the bobber took a dip into the water. Daddy talked her through reeling the keeper-sized fish onto the shore.

"I'll name him Lucky, because he is lucky I caught him!" she proudly announced.

Lucky's luck ran out, though, when he realized this wasn't going to be a catch-and-release situation. 

**************************
I'm joining again with the Six Sentence Story link-up. Go read the other entries, and feel free to add your own. This week's prompt: release.